BOF: Is There Hope for Wholesale?

BOF: Is There Hope for Wholesale?

“Everyone woke up to the fact that if they sold product directly, their margins could be so much higher,” said Robert Burke, a retail consultant. “This is how younger brands are looking at it today. They want to control their distribution.”

“Because the business has been challenging, there is an aversion to risk,” Burke added. “And because of the aversion, the consumer feels like nothing is exciting and nothing is interesting.”

“The thing is, the stores are going to be important,” Burke said. “But not important to the degree that you have to have one in every city in America.”

WWD: Burke's Law: Remake and Modernize the Retail Setting

WWD: Burke's Law: Remake and Modernize the Retail Setting

“First we go out and examine who else is in the market, what’s the competition and what they’re doing. It’s a market assessment to see where the opportunities are. Then we conceptualize the retail strategy for our client; what brands are right for the project. We act as a liaison between property owners or developers and the brands,” explained John Mitchell, president of Robert Burke Associates.

The RBA team brings luxury to many projects but leaves room for other categories, creating a spectrum of prices, products and services that the team feels are relevant to how people shop today.

“The customer who buys Chanel is the same customer going to NikeLab and they’re going to Apple and want to go to SoulCycle,” Robert Burke said. “You still have to have fashion. But what we’ve done in these projects is really mixing it.”

Ron Frasch advocates “humanizing,” or bringing down the scale of, brick-and-mortar retail. “I love small. It feels so valid today,” he said.

NYT: The Resurrection of Dolce & Gabbana

NYT: The Resurrection of Dolce & Gabbana

Robert Burke, the founder of the Robert Burke Associates consultancy, said: “The fashion world as a whole has a short memory span. It lasts about the amount of time from one show to the next.” (That’s around five months, which is in fact about how much time has passed between the Dolce China crash and today.) 

Then he pointed out that fashion loves a comeback story and noted that John Galliano, who was ignominiously fired from Christian Dior after reports of a drug-and-alcohol-fueled anti-Semitic rant in a Paris bar, is currently the much celebrated creative director of Maison Margiela.

IBD: Will Levi Strauss be the Next Lululemon as Jeans Make Fashion Industry Comeback?

IBD: Will Levi Strauss be the Next Lululemon as Jeans Make Fashion Industry Comeback?

"Denim is in my mind having a resurgence, but coming back in a different way," says Robert Burke Associates CEO Robert Burke. "No longer is the customer as willing to wear an uncomfortable pair of jeans, or a restricting pair of jeans, or the Japanese denim that's as stiff as a board and takes months to break in." "When I look at why these things happen, it happens usually in multiple categories," he said. "I think we saw it with the trend of casual footwear and athletic footwear being acceptable in the workplace. Whereas seven years ago, it was only acceptable in the gym."

WWD: Bridget Foley's Diary: Rihanna and the Rest

WWD: Bridget Foley's Diary: Rihanna and the Rest

“Everything is in flux,” said Robert Burke, founder of consultants Robert Burke Associates. “What’s appealing today to the consumer, it’s not as traditional as what we have known in the past. When I look at someone like Virgil [Abloh] or I look at what’s happening today at Gucci, [with] Michele, being a very unknown designer, it’s impossible today to separate sheer design, classically trained design and marketing.”

CPP LUXURY: Understanding the complex evolution of luxury in the U.S.

CPP LUXURY: Understanding the complex evolution of luxury in the U.S.

In the most recent past, if you look at for example the 80s, 90s and early 2000s, luxury was defined primarily by a level of exclusivity that was driven by pricing. Luxury product was more heavily centered around logos, so these two elements together clearly conveyed a certain level of status. Now that we’ve transitioned towards “lifestyle” shopping, luxury has become much more multi-faceted. Luxury is now more about the value that the brand and its products add to the consumer’s lifestyle.

BOF: Why Luxury Fashion Can't Resist an Exclusive

BOF: Why Luxury Fashion Can't Resist an Exclusive

“The exclusives thing is getting overused and losing its effectiveness,” said Robert Burke, founder and chief executive at Robert Burke Associates. “It needs to be re-evaluated.”

WWD: ON STAFF: No More ‘Pretty Woman’ Moments in Retail

WWD: ON STAFF: No More ‘Pretty Woman’ Moments in Retail

According to industry watchers, part of the reason for this change in mind-set is the traditional model encourages sales executives to focus their attention on those that they think will spend the most money, which is now harder than ever to decipher. “Between Goldman Sachs announcing their dress casual to the Internet companies, it doesn’t behoove anyone to presume who the customer is or not,” Robert Burke, a retail consultant, said.

WWD: The Markle Economy Stretches to Baby, Too

WWD: The Markle Economy Stretches to Baby, Too

While the influence of the royal family has always had appeal, Robert Burke, chairman and chief executive officer of Robert Burke Associates, says Markle is even more popular than the Duchess of Cambridge because of her background. “Meghan represents a less-conforming [person] than the expected perception of a royal and I think she will connect with even more people. She’ll dress children pretty tastefully, but it won’t be as traditional and prim and proper; it will have more fun and whimsy,” he said.

BoF:  What the Return of the Cargo Pant Reveals About Consumer Psychology

BoF: What the Return of the Cargo Pant Reveals About Consumer Psychology

“The cargo pant trend has the life of a cockroach,” said Robert Burke, a luxury consultant and former senior vice president of fashion at Bergdorf Goodman. He puts the pants into the category of “ugly” pieces enjoying a new life, like “dad” sneakers and “mom” jeans. Cargo pants are also the rare style to hit every spending segment of the market, Burke added, without following the usual trickle-down pattern of a trend cycle.

BBC: Levi's ride 1980s Denim Trend Back to Stock Market Relisting

BBC: Levi's ride 1980s Denim Trend Back to Stock Market Relisting

Robert Burke, a retail and fashion consultant, says: "The jean industry in general had been heavily affected by how strong the athleisure and athletic market had become.

"Leggings, yoga pants, things like that had been chipping away and in many ways replaced the jean business as a category."

BOF: 6 Things You Need to Know About the New Galeries Lafayette

BOF: 6 Things You Need to Know About the New Galeries Lafayette

Galeries Lafayette has big ambitions for its new Champs-Elysées store, though it’s only a tenth of the size of the retailer’s Boulevard Haussmann flagship. “We’re seeing interest in smaller retail environments that are more intimate, where it’s easier to create a relationship with the customer and carefully select a mix of up-and-coming and big luxury brands. The idea that bigger is better is not the trend,” explained retail consultant Robert Burke.

WWD: Brazilian Retailer Farm Rio Debuts U.S. Web Site

WWD: Brazilian Retailer Farm Rio Debuts U.S. Web Site

Robert Burke, chairman and chief executive officer of Robert Burke Associates, who has been working with Farm Rio, said, “Farm Rio has been loved in Brazil for many years because of their vibrant and unique prints and how they encapsulate the Rio lifestyle. Fashion consumers today are looking for something unique, special and emotional. Farm Rio achieves that in the way it embodies everything Brazil represents.”